Aggravated Speeding as a Class A or Class B Misdemeanor in Illinois - Driving Crimes

Everyone who gets behind the wheel of a vehicle in the state of Illinois has a responsibility to follow driving laws across the state. in many cases, violating a driving law only results in a ticket. Tickets don’t go on your criminal record. Instead, they’re settled between you and the state, typically by way of you paying a fine or professing your innocence in court and getting the ticket dismissed. however, there are some driving violations that results in criminal charges, and aggravated speeding is one of them. Here’s what you need to know.

Aggravated Speeding as a Class A or Class B Misdemeanor in Illinois

Aggravated speeding is a Class A or Class B misdemeanor in the state of Illinois. The following sections explore aggravated speeding so you know what to do if you’re charged with this crime.

What is Aggravated Speeding?

Aggravated speeding is the act of going 26 miles per hour or more over the posted speed limit. Aggravated speeding falls into two categories; one is a Class A misdemeanor and one is a Class B misdemeanor.

When is Aggravated Speeding a Class B Misdemeanor?

Aggravated speeding is a Class B misdemeanor when you are traveling 26 miles per hour over the posted speed limit, but you are traveling less than 35 miles per hour over it. For example, if the speed limit is 50 miles per hour and you’re traveling between 76 and 84 miles per hour, you can be charged with aggravated speeding as a Class B misdemeanor.

The penalty for Class B misdemeanor is up to 180 days in the county jail, plus a fine of up to $1,500.

Related: Can you work as a nurse in Illinois if you have a criminal record?

When is Aggravated Speeding a Class A Misdemeanor?

Aggravated speeding is a Class A misdemeanor when you are traveling at a speed 35 miles per hour over the posted speed limit. That means if the speed limit is 50 miles per hour and you are traveling 85 miles per hour or more, you can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor.

The penalty for a Class A misdemeanor is up to a year in the county jail and a fine of up to $2,500.

Related: What is an MDDP after a drunk driving conviction?

What Should You Do if You’re Charged With Aggravated Speeding?

If you are charged with aggravated speeding, you should speak to an attorney about criminal defense. Because aggravated speeding is a crime, and because it goes on your criminal record, it’s more serious than simply paying a fine or facing losing your driver’s license. The consequences can be very harsh, including jail time and heavy fines. You have the right to speak to an attorney and have an attorney represent you, so use it.

Related: What is BAIID, and what does it have to do with a drunk driving conviction?

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